armyofghosts:

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squeakychiona:

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particlecollisions:

particlecollisions:

Self defence sprays that are legal to carry and use in the United Kingdom

Image 1: Farbgel
Image 2: StoppaRed

I’ve seen a lot of people (mostly women, for reasons which may be obvious) speaking about being worried when going out, be it alone or even with friends, both in the day and at night. I know that a lot of female friends of mine carry around a can of antiperspirant or a pot of pepper to use if they’re ever attacked. What I know a lot of people don’t realise is that there are products out there which work in a violent situation and help in catching the assailant for the best part of a week afterwards.

Known as ‘criminal identifiers’, these sprays are brightly coloured dyes which can be sprayed in the face of an attacker. Unlike things such as CS or Pepper sprays, criminal identifier sprays are legal in the UK.

There’s a few available on the market, with farbgel and Mace’s Stoppared being the mostly highly recommended.

What these sprays do is release a sticky, brightly coloured dye. It’s difficult to wipe away and stains the skin a bright red colour. No matter how hard an attacker might try to remove it from their skin and clothing, the staining typically lasts for around a week and doesn’t even start to fade until after a few days have passed.

Unlike CS and Pepper sprays (which, again, aren’t legal in the UK) criminal identifier sprays don’t cause irritation or pain to an attacker. Instead, they expand and clog up the area sprayed with a kind of sticky foam that’s difficult to wipe away. It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.

Each can of the sprays costs around £10 each, though it may be cheaper when buying multiple canisters and if you shop around.

FarbGel 

StoppaRed UV Personal Attack Self-Defence Spray by Mace

This is an original post, but I’ve released it into the public domain. It can be shared, altered, reposted in whole or in part with no need for attribution (though obviously I would appreciate it!)

cc @misandry-mermaid

It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.

That’s brilliant

I wish I could get this. Is this legal in the US to own? I would love to have this, and even better when you spray someone with it, it’s like a banner that reads;

"I’m a disgusting asshole who assaults women."

Kinda reminds me how Spartan women use to carry knives to cut whoever assaulted them

thecsph:

Sex positivity means many things, but it does not mean that all sex is positive or enjoyable.

theroguefeminist:

body shaming is real, and due to misogyny, all women experience it

but skinny shaming isn’t real and the body shaming thin people get is much less severe and a lot different

all women feel badly about their bodies at some point in their lives, and criticizing people’s bodies is wrong

but doctors not unfrequently will give fat people terrible treatment that results in their death due to their weight

this does not hardly ever happen to skinny people

fat people will literally experience abuse at the hands of their parents and incessant bullying at their schools at an epidemic scale due to their weight and it’s seen as socially permissable

fat people get shitty representation in the media, and are either under-represented or mocked

thinness is upheld as a goal, fatness as a curse that automatically makes you ugly

so it’s qualitatively a different thing

Women don’t speak out against catcalling because they are “sanctimonious.” They speak out against it because it’s threatening and demeaning. Catcalling is terrifying specifically because it has the potential to turn into physical violence at any moment if the woman does the “wrong” thing. Writer Soraya Chemaly has documented just a few of these many news stories.

It’s disturbing that Lewak is so desperate for random men to approve of her appearance that she’s willing to take the risk that these interactions turn sour–not only that, but she’s willing to take that risk for all of us. She writes, “Oh, don’t go rolling those sanctimonious eyes at me, young women of Vassar: I may court catcalls, but I hold my head high. Enjoying male attention doesn’t make you a traitor to your gender.”

Most people who are attracted to men enjoy some sort of male attention, but not all of us enjoy it from any man, at any time, in any place. Kind of like I love pizza, but I don’t want people to shove pizza in my face every time I leave my apartment. Actually, I would probably start to kind of hate pizza if that happened, especially if trying to refuse the pizza led to slurs and threats of violence.

In the 1930s, men’s nipples were just as provocative, shameful and taboo as women’s are now, and men were protesting in much the same way. In 1930, four men went topless to Coney Island and were arrested. In 1935, a flash mob of topless men descended upon Atlantic City, 42 of whom were arrested. Men fought and they were heard, changing not only laws but social consciousness. And by 1936, men’s bare chests were accepted as the norm.

So why is it that 80 years later women can’t seem to achieve the same for their chests? Why can’t a mother proudly breastfeed her child in public without feeling sexualized? why is a 17-year-old girl being asked to leave her own prom because a group of fathers find her too provocative?

[…] I am not trying to argue for mandatory toplessness, or even bralessness. What I am arguing for is a woman’s right to choose how she represents her body — and to make that choice based on personal desire and not a fear of how people will react to her or how society will judge her. No woman should be made to feel ashamed of her body.

Scout Willis, in XOJane, on Instagram’s nudity policy and why she recently strolled the NYC streets topless. Solid essay all around. I found this piece particularly interesting because I’d never heard about the men’s nipples thing. (via batmansymbol)

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/scout-willis-on-topless-instagram-protest-im-arguing-for-a-womans-right-to-choose-how-she-represents-her-body-9483365.html 

(via stfueverything)

arzeskoenigs:

anunconsciousreality:

arzeskoenigs:

I’m SICK of all the ‘thin people should put up with body shaming because larger people have to’ this is PEOPLes bODIES WE ARE TALKING AHOUT THIS IS LITERALLY PEOPLES HUMAN bodiES THAT THEY WERE BORN IN PLEASE STOP ACTING LIKE CHILDREN AND ACTUALLY INCLUDE EVERYONE IN BODY POSITIIVITY AND STOP SAYING THAT SKINNY PPL CAN JUST GO TO A MAGAZINE AND FEEL BETTER BECAUSE BELIEVE IT OR NOT THAT DOESNT WORK IF YOURE UNCOMFORTABLE WITH UR BODY PLS GROW UP AND RECOGNISE PEOPLE AHVE FEELINGS

They shouldn’t put up with body shaming, nobody should. But I read an interesting point about it.

"Because here’s the thing: Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people reallydo make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

Very, very true i agree 100%

agoodgirlneverlies:

daddiescummies:

michaxl:

reblogging so i never lose this. ever

jessepinkmanist:

life hack: if you don’t want this to happen when clicking urls

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hold in ctrl while clicking